Discoveries Magazine

Cedars-Sinai

Cardiology

Picture Perfect

Cedars-Sinai scientists developed a new quantitative cardiac MRI technique dubbed MR Multitasking that solves the longstanding problem of how to snap a clear image when a beating heart, flowing blood, and breathing lungs could blur the picture.

Stats: Rejection Overruled

Cedars-Sinai surgeons have been performing transplantations since 1966, while collaborating with scientists to pioneer techniques that improve matchmaking—including ways to unite incompatible blood types and prevent organ rejection.

Pacemakers: An Evolution

1. Mid- to late 1960s 2. Late 1960s/early 1970s 3. 1970s 4. Early 1960s 5. Late 1970s 6. Early 1980s 7. Current 8. Late 1970s 9. Current (implantable cardiac defibrillator) Photograph: Rachael Porter, featuring the collection of Howard Allen, MD Read On

Open-Hearted

Thanks to Cedars-Sinai and interventional cardiologist Evan Zahn, MD, Cheryl Davis, 48, became the first person in the world to receive a new, implantable device for repairing congenital cardiac defects—without open-heart surgery.

Postdocs Play Pivotal Research Role

Dr. Jon Sin exemplifies the role postdoctoral scientists play in Cedars-Sinai’s research efforts. Photo: Al Cuizon Cedars-Sinai is considered a leader in biomedical science for at least 144 reasons — which is the exact number of postdoctoral scientists who work Read On

Storm Chasers

In a landmark discovery, Cedars-Sinai investigators showed that more than 50 percent of sudden cardiac arrest patients experience warning symptoms up to a month before suffering the event — a deadly condition that, until now, seemed to strike without warning.

A Pound of Cure

A study at Cedars-Sinai applies its individualized tactics to investigate how adverse pregnancy outcomes can be used to identify women at risk for cardiovascular disease.

Bananas About a Protein

A tiny molecule discovered by Cedars-Sinai Heart Institute investigators — and fittingly named the “banana protein” — might hold the key to predicting heart failure.