Discoveries Magazine

Cedars-Sinai

Heart

Big Leaps for Baby Steps

With philanthropic support, Dr. Evan Zahn developed a procedure to treat patent ductus arteriosus (PDA), the most common heart problem among extremely premature babies. He also harnessed 3D printing technology to build reconstructed models of individual patients’ hearts to plan and practice transcatheter interventions before performing the procedures on vulnerable newborns.

Care Package

The Mitra Microsampler is an at-home blood-draw tool that helps patients collect tiny drops of blood for precise biometric monitoring and heart health.

Picture Perfect

Cedars-Sinai scientists developed a new quantitative cardiac MRI technique dubbed MR Multitasking that solves the longstanding problem of how to snap a clear image when a beating heart, flowing blood, and breathing lungs could blur the picture.

Stats: Rejection Overruled

Cedars-Sinai surgeons have been performing transplantations since 1966, while collaborating with scientists to pioneer techniques that improve matchmaking—including ways to unite incompatible blood types and prevent organ rejection.

Pacemakers: An Evolution

1. Mid- to late 1960s 2. Late 1960s/early 1970s 3. 1970s 4. Early 1960s 5. Late 1970s 6. Early 1980s 7. Current 8. Late 1970s 9. Current (implantable cardiac defibrillator) Photograph: Rachael Porter, featuring the collection of Howard Allen, MD Read On

Picture Not Perfect

Young, athletic women who think they can outrun heart disease need to think again. While the condition is declining in nearly every other demographic, women aged 35–44 are experiencing an alarming increase in heart-related illness.

Open-Hearted

Thanks to Cedars-Sinai and interventional cardiologist Evan Zahn, MD, Cheryl Davis, 48, became the first person in the world to receive a new, implantable device for repairing congenital cardiac defects—without open-heart surgery.

Heart Health and a Haircut

A haircut can make a guy feel like a new man—and, thanks to Cedars-Sinai investigators, maybe even save his life. A groundbreaking study published in the New England Journal of Medicine has found that African- American men successfully lowered their Read On