Discoveries Magazine

Cedars-Sinai

heart

Picture Not Perfect

Young, athletic women who think they can outrun heart disease need to think again. While the condition is declining in nearly every other demographic, women aged 35–44 are experiencing an alarming increase in heart-related illness.

Open-Hearted

Thanks to Cedars-Sinai and interventional cardiologist Evan Zahn, MD, Cheryl Davis, 48, became the first person in the world to receive a new, implantable device for repairing congenital cardiac defects—without open-heart surgery.

For the Boys

Scientists have struggled for decades to find answers for boys with Duchenne muscular dystrophy, a devastating muscle disorder. But now, new research into cardiac stem cells is offering hope — and going straight to the heart of what cuts patients’ lives so short.

We Have the Technology

Physicians don’t need new machines to predict congenital heart defects in newborns — they just need to better use existing resources.

Of Hearts and Hormones

Over the past 15 years, fear of cancer and other risks has led to far fewer women using hormone replacement therapy (HRT). New evidence may reverse that trend.

Safer Heart Surgeries

While most patients recover fully from open-heart surgery, some suffer long-term effects from the stress caused by the operation. Cedars-Sinai scientists are collecting data — and damaged cells — from heart transplant patients to improve recovery.

To Mend the Smallest Hearts

Cardiologists at Cedars-Sinai have modified a tried-and-true surgical procedure to successfully treat the most common heart problem among extremely premature babies, patent ductus arteriosus (PDA).

Storm Chasers

In a landmark discovery, Cedars-Sinai investigators showed that more than 50 percent of sudden cardiac arrest patients experience warning symptoms up to a month before suffering the event — a deadly condition that, until now, seemed to strike without warning.