Discoveries Magazine

Cedars-Sinai

neuro

Eyes on the Brain

Philanthropic support led to a breakthrough in detecting Alzheimer’s disease early: a simple, noninvasive eye exam to detect Alzheimer’s disease up to two decades before it becomes symptomatic.

You Must Remember This

A Cedars-Sinai study illuminates how the human brain forms new recollections—providing insights into potential treatments for neurodegenerative diseases.

Do I Look Fat in these Genes?

Scientists at Cedars-Sinai are recreating brain neurons to study obesity and personalize treatment.

Cancer in the Air

While air pollution has long been linked to disease, a recent Cedars-Sinai study reveals how nickel particles and other airborne matter influence genetics in a potentially damaging way.

Wingspan Spreads

A specialized stenting system used to open blocked arteries in the brain could change how we treat strokes. Intracranial stenosis —a narrowing of brain arteries caused by the buildup and hardening of fatty deposits—can lead to strokes. Blood thinners, cholesterol Read On

Aluminum Foiled

The aluminum in your pots and pans wont give you Alzheimer’s disease. Nor do hair dyes cause brain cancer. But what about cell phones? And microwaves? Our neuroscience experts set the record straight on common myths and misconceptions surrounding brain diseases.

Unbreakable

Chelsy Colangelo knows her brain is dying. “I’ve had a stroke! You have to help me!” But the plea collapses before reaching her lips. Instead, Chelsy’s frantic thoughts spin circles in a smoldering maze of circuits in her brain — only to crash, crumble, or vaporize in the glare of emergency room lights. Her brain is dying, and no one knows but her.

Path to Prevention

The insidious nature of Alzheimer’s disease — with onset starting many years before symptoms appear — has reinforced the sense that it strikes at random, without warning or recourse. However, hope exists, with a growing number of experts arguing that the course of the disease can be changed, provided it is diagnosed early enough.