Discoveries Magazine

Cedars-Sinai

Regenerative Medicine

Good to the Bone

In a landmark study, Cedars-Sinai researchers showed that a combination of adult stem cells and a specific bone-building hormone may significantly speed up the rate at which fractures caused by osteoporosis will mend.

The Trailblazer

Jennifer Van Eyk is a leader in proteomics, which uses molecular biology, biochemistry, and genetics to analyze the structure, functions, and interactions of proteins.

Off With Their Tails!

Regenerative medicine is an emerging science that aims to regrow or restore function in diseased, damaged, or aging tissue by revitalizing cells or transplanting new ones. At Cedars-Sinai, the Regenerative Medicine Institute generates induced pluripotent stem cells—harvested from adult human Read On

Ten Breakthroughs in Ten Years

Explore a decade of advances made possible by stem cell research and the potential scientists see for the future.

Connecting the Dots

The research universe at Cedars-Sinai is boundless. Investigators are currently conducting more than 1,000 studies that cover the entire spectrum of disease investigation in areas such as cancer, cardiovascular disorders, and neuroscience. At the Advanced Health Sciences Pavilion, institutes in Read On

ALS in the Strike Zone

Like Lou Gehrig, Sal Silva used to love feeling the impact of a ball against his bat before ALS relegated him to the sidelines. And like the scientists searching for cures and developing improved treatments for the debilitating disease, he refuses to give up. Read On

Putting Viruses to Work for a Good Cause

Illustration: Neil Webb After enduring eons of suffering inflicted by viruses, humans are now employing these infective agents to do good work. That’s the mission of the new Viral Vector Core at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center’s Regenerative Medicine Institute. Directed by Read On

Scientists Serve Up Disease ‘in a Dish’

Huntington’s disease has eluded medical science—no cure or treatment exists to stop its fatal progression. A brand-new tool might change that: a model that allows scientists to test potential therapies directly on human cells. Scientists at Cedars-Sinai’s Regenerative Medicine Institute Read On