Discoveries Magazine

Cedars-Sinai

Women’s Health

Top Guns: Bobbie J. Rimel, MD & Cholene Espinoza, MD

Today, Cedars-Sinai medical resident Cholene Espinoza, MD, studies sonograms, looking for the curves of a baby hidden in a mother’s womb. But 25 years ago, her astute eye was used for something different: flying a spy airplane.

We Have the Technology

Illustration: James Steinberg Physicians don’t need new machines to predict newborn heart defects — they just need to better use existing resources. Congenital heart disease is the most common birth defect, affecting 1 in every 120 newborns. If a cardiac Read On

Medicine’s Gender Gap

When Harvard Medical School admitted its first female, in 1850, vigorous protests ensued, prompting the groundbreaking student to withdraw. History would soon be on her side. By the end of World War I, women were trickling into the profession. Eventually, Read On

Stats: Women in Clinical Trials

24 Percentage of female participants in heart-related studies (reported in 2014), even though heart disease is the leading cause of death for women in the U.S. 3 The number of representatives in Congress currently co-sponsoring the Research for All Act. Read On

Beyond the Bench

CASE STUDY 5: In the Delivery Room When you add rock and roll — literally — to labor, the result can be a faster delivery and a more satisfying childbirth experience. This is the outcome of a study in which Read On

Fearless Fighters

What do former Miss America Mary Ann Mobley and Armando E. Giuliano, MD, share? The close bond inspired by nearly a decade as patient and doctor—and the tenacity to battle breast cancer. Read On

10 Big Ideas

What ideas are shaping tomorrow’s medicine? What are the coming innovations in treating heart disease and cancer? What is the latest thinking in genetics and regenerative medicine? From the minds of our scientists and clinicians, we bring you 10 noteworthy, thought-provoking ideas that have the potential to transform medicine. Read On

Who’s Who: Steven Rad, MD

Over the winter holiday of 2010, Steven Rad, MD—a third-year obstetrics and gynecology resident at Cedars-Sinai—traveled 9,300 miles to Mbarara Hospital in Uganda in East Africa. For one week, he and his mentor Dotun Ogunyemi, MD, director of Cedars-Sinai’s Obstetrics and Gynecology residency training program, partnered with their counterparts in Mbarara, seeing patients, conducting rounds, delivering babies, and teaching. Read On